CCLA concerned by Supreme Court judgment on police cell phone searches

The Supreme Court’s decision this morning in R. v. Fearon gives the police seemingly wide latitude to search cell phones – without warrants – upon individuals’ arrest.  The Canadian Civil Liberties Association is concerned that the judgment represents a significant blow to the privacy rights of average Canadians.  Searching cell phones or any personal digital [...]

'On the Record' Workshop Series: Spreading the word about police record checks

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association and the John Howard Society of Ontario are teaming up to deliver educational workshops on police record checks across the province of Ontario!

Police records present numerous barriers for individuals who have had past police contact or justice involvement and who are attempting to find employment, housing and even treatment. Traditionally [...]

CCLA Applauds Revised Ontario Record Check Guidelines

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association applauds today’s release of revised police record check guidelines for Ontario.

The revised guidelines are the result of two years of collaboration and dialogue between the CCLA and the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP), including significant evidentiary research and community consultation. In CCLA’s view, the guidelines, which eliminate the [...]

A Win at the Supreme Court on Internet Privacy

The Supreme Court of Canada has rendered its decision in R. v. Spencer, a case that considered the privacy interests that an individual has in Internet activities and affirmed that anonymity is a key component of the right to privacy.  The Court also clarified a point of long-standing disagreement between privacy advocates and law enforcement [...]

CCLA Appears Before Committee Considering Bill C-13 (Protecting Canadians From Online Crime Act)

On June 5, 2014 CCLA appeared before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights as part of its consideration on Bill C-13, the government’s so-called cyberbullying legislation.  Other than creating a new offence to deal with the non-consensual distribution of intimate images, the Bill has very little to do with cyberbullying. [...]