Civil Society Statement Regarding Bill C-59

April 5, 2018

(Le texte français suivra)

Civil Society Statement Regarding Bill C-59, An Act Respecting National Security Matters

Bill C-59 was explicitly introduced with the claim that it fixes “the problematic aspects” of its predecessor, Bill C-51—now Canada’s Anti-terrorism Act, 2015.

We, the undersigned civil society organizations and individual experts, are concerned that C-59 does not truly fix all of the problems with our current national security law, and it has introduced some very serious new issues.

The Bill was referred to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security (SECU) after first reading, which leaves open the possibility for amendments. SECU has had the opportunity to hear from many of us, and many others, about where Bill C-59 falls short, where it oversteps, and how it can be improved to ensure that it takes a rights-centric approach to national security. The coming days and weeks are a crucial time to speak out.  As Bill C-59 moves through Parliament our government needs to hear from those who think that Canada deserves better and that this legislation can and must protect national security while firmly and unequivocally upholding human rights.

There is consensus amongst civil liberties and human rights organizations about some of the most troubling aspects of Bill C-59. Our concerns focus on: 1) the bill’s empowerment of our national security agencies to conduct mass surveillance; 2) the practical impossibility of an individual effectively challenging their inclusion on the “no-fly list”; and 3) the authorization of Canada’s signals intelligence agency, CSE, to conduct cyberattacks. While these by no means represent the only problems with Bill C-59 that require “fixes”, they are among the areas where change is both urgently required and most broadly supported.

Authorizing Mass Surveillance

We acknowledge the increase in oversight and review that may be achieved with the creation of a National Security Intelligence Review Agency and an Intelligence Commissioner. However, Bill C-59 also expressly empowers mass surveillance through the collection of bulk data and “publicly available” data – a term that is not clearly defined in the bill in relation to datasets collected by our human intelligence agency, CSIS, and extraordinarily expansively defined for the CSE.  In both cases, “publicly available” is open to interpretations that are as sweeping as they are troubling. In particular, there is no requirement that publicly available information must have been lawfully obtained. In the absence of effective limits in the law, the bodies that have been set up to improve accountability may review or oversee mass surveillance activities, but not necessarily prevent or limit them. The bill also lowers the threshold to allow CSIS to collect information about Canadians – even data that is expressly acknowledged to not relate directly and immediately to activities threatening the security of Canada–if it is “relevant,” rather than restricting collection to information that is necessary. There has been little meaningful debate on whether this lower threshold is necessary or reasonable in light of the goals the government seeks to achieve.

Secret trials with secret evidence for individuals on the “no fly” list

The no-fly list has never been shown to increase aviation safety. Bill C-59 perpetuates a scheme that severely limits rights based on a mere suspicion of dangerousness that cannot be effectively challenged in a fair and open process. The government’s proposed redress system for those mistakenly on a list of people subject to enhanced security screening (“slow fly list”) does not assist those who are simply prohibited from flying. These individuals face a process in which they can legally be denied information relevant to their case, can be denied access to their own hearing and have no right to an independent special advocate with access to all of the evidence against them. SECU has already recommended a number of changes to the no-fly list including the use of Special Advocates. Some of us, and others,  have gone further, and argued for the repeal of the “no fly” system completely. Successive governments have allowed this system to endure for over a decade, and it is imperative that the fundamental rights issues it poses be acknowledged and addressed.

Legalizing Cyberattacks by “Canada’s NSA”, the Communications Security Establishment (CSE)

We are seeing our “intelligence” agencies transformed in dangerous directions. C-59 continues to allow CSIS active “disruption” powers and now also gives the CSE new powers to use cyber-attacks against foreign individuals, states, organizations or terrorist groups.  This would include hacking, deploying malware, and “disinformation campaigns”. There is a significant danger of normalizing state-sponsored hacking, not to mention the obvious tension when the agency mandated with protecting our cyber infrastructure is also powerfully incentivized to hide and hoard security vulnerabilities for its own attack exploits.  We need a public discussion about what threats these attack powers are meant to address and what new threats they may open us up to if a Canadian attack results in cyberwar escalation.

Canadians were told that the new law would “fix” the old law.  Instead, we got a bill that nominally addresses some concerns, but exploits the opportunity to introduce more radical new powers for national security agencies.

If the goal of Bill C-59 is truly to “fix” Canada’s national security laws, there is still much work to be done.

Signed by (alphabetical order):

Amnesty International Canada
BC Civil Liberties Association
BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association
Canadian Association of University Teachers
Canadian Civil Liberties Association
Canadian Federation of Students
Canadian Journalists for Free Expression
Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Independent Jewish Voices Canada
International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group
Inter Pares
Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada
Ligue des droits et libertés
MiningWatch Canada
National Council of Canadian Muslims
National Union of Public and General Employees (NUPGE)
OpenMedia
Privacy and Access Council of Canada — Conseil du Canada de l’Accès et la vie Privée
Rideau Institute
Rocky Mountain Civil Liberties Association
Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)

As Individuals:

Elizabeth Block, Independent Jewish Voices, Canadian Friends Service Committee
James L. Turk, Director, Centre for Free Expression, Ryerson University
Sharon Polsky, MAPP, Data Protection Advocate & Privacy by Design Ambassador
Sid Shniad, Member of the national steering committee, Independent Jewish Voices Canada

To add your voice and send this message to parliamentarians, click here.
For more information on Bill C-59, click here


claration de la société civile sur le projet de loi C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale

Le gouvernement canadien a déposé le projet de loi C-59 en affirmant explicitement que ce dernier est une solution aux «aspects problématiques» de son prédécesseur, le projet de loi C-51 — maintenant la Loi antiterroriste de 2015.

Nous, les organisations de la société civile et les expert.es individuel.les soussigné.es, sommes préoccupé.es par le fait que le projet de loi C-59 non seulement ne règle pas tous les problèmes liés à la législation actuelle sur la sécurité nationale, mais il introduit aussi des nouveaux problèmes très sérieux.

Le projet de loi a été renvoyé au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la Chambre des communes (SECU) après la première lecture, laissant la porte ouverte à d’importants amendements. SECU a eu l’occasion d’entendre plusieurs d’entre nous, et beaucoup d’autres, au sujet du projet de loi C-59 : ses lacunes, comment il dépasse les limites et comment il peut être amélioré afin d’assurer une approche de la sécurité nationale centrée sur les droits. Les jours et les semaines à venir sont une période cruciale pour faire entendre nos voix. Pendant que le projet de loi C-59 progresse au Parlement, notre gouvernement doit écouter ceux et celles qui pensent que le Canada mérite mieux et que cette loi peut et doit protéger la sécurité nationale tout en respectant fermement et sans équivoque les droits de la personne.

Les organisations de défense des droits humains et des libertés civiles s’entendent sur les aspects les plus troublants du projet de loi C-59. Nos préoccupations portent sur : 1) la légalisation de la surveillance de masse; 2) l’impossibilité pratique pour un individu de contester efficacement son inclusion sur la «liste d’interdiction de vol»; et 3) l’autorisation de lancer des cyberattaques donnée à l’agence de renseignement électronique du Canada, le CST. Bien que ces trois points ne représentent en aucun cas les seuls problèmes liés au projet de loi C-59 nécessitant des «correctifs», ils font partie des domaines où le changement est à la fois urgent et le plus largement soutenu.

Autorisation de la surveillance de masse

Nous reconnaissons qu’une augmentation de la responsabilisation en matière de sécurité nationale pourrait être réalisée grâce à la création du poste de Commissaire au renseignement ainsi que de l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Cependant, le projet de loi C-59 autorise expressément la surveillance de masse par la collecte de données en vrac et de données «accessibles au public» — un terme qui n’est pas clairement défini dans le projet de loi relativement aux «ensembles de données» recueillis par le SCRS, notre agence de renseignement domestique, et qui est défini de façon extraordinairement large pour le CST. Dans les deux cas, «accessible au public» est ouvert à des interprétations aussi générales que troublantes. En particulier, il n’est pas nécessaire que les informations accessibles au public aient été obtenues légalement. En l’absence de limites efficaces dans la loi, les organismes qui seront mis en place afin d’améliorer la reddition de comptes pourront réviser ou superviser les activités de surveillance de masse, mais pas nécessairement les empêcher ou les limiter. Le projet de loi C-59 abaisse également le seuil permettant au SCRS de recueillir de l’information sur les Canadien.nes. Alors que la cueillette devait auparavant être «nécessaire», elle n’aurait maintenant qu’à être «pertinente» à l’exercice des fonctions du SCRS. Même les données expressément reconnues comme n’étant pas directement et immédiatement en lien avec des menaces à la sécurité du Canada pourront être recueillies à l’avenir. Il y a eu peu de débats significatifs à savoir si ce seuil inférieur est nécessaire ou raisonnable compte tenu des objectifs que le gouvernement cherche à atteindre.

Procès et preuves secrètes pour les individus sur la liste d’interdiction de vol

Il n’a jamais été démontré que la liste d’interdiction de vol augmente la sécurité aérienne. Le projet de loi C-59 perpétue un régime qui limite sévèrement les droits en raison d’un simple soupçon de dangerosité qui ne peut être efficacement contesté dans le cadre d’un processus équitable et ouvert. Le système de réparation proposé par le gouvernement pour ceux et celles qui sont inclus.es, par erreur, sur une liste de personnes faisant l’objet d’un contrôle de sécurité renforcé («slow fly list») n’aide pas ceux et celles à qui ont interdit de voler. Ces personnes sont confrontées à un processus dans lequel elles peuvent légalement se voir refuser des informations pertinentes à leur cas, se voir refuser l’accès à leur propre procès, et dans lequel elles n’ont pas droit à un avocat spécial indépendant ayant accès à toutes les preuves contre elles. SECU a déjà recommandé un certain nombre de changements à la liste d’interdiction de vol, y compris l’utilisation d’avocats spéciaux. Certains d’entre nous, et d’autres, sont allés plus loin et ont plaidé en faveur de l’abrogation complète de la liste d’interdiction de vol. Les gouvernements successifs ont permis à ce système de durer pendant plus d’une décennie, et il est impératif que les problèmes qu’il pose en matière de droits fondamentaux soient reconnus et réglés.

Légalisation des cyberattaques par la «NSA du Canada», le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications (CST)

Nous observons de dangereuses transformations opérées sur nos agences de «renseignement». Le projet de loi C-59 continue d’autoriser le SCRS à exercer des pouvoirs de «perturbation» et donne maintenant au CST des nouveaux pouvoirs de lancer des cyberattaques contre des personnes, des États, des organisations ou des groupes terroristes étrangers. Cela comprendrait le piratage, le déploiement de logiciels malveillants et les «campagnes de désinformation». Il existe un danger important de normalisation du piratage parrainé par l’État, sans parler de la tension évidente lorsque l’agence mandatée de protéger notre cyber infrastructure est aussi fortement encouragée à cacher et exploiter les vulnérabilités de sécurité pour ses propres attaques. Nous avons besoin d’une discussion publique sur les menaces auxquelles ces pouvoirs d’attaque sont censés répondre ainsi que sur les nouvelles menaces auxquelles ils pourraient nous exposer si une attaque canadienne dégénérait en cyberguerre.

Le gouvernement a dit aux Canadien.nes que la nouvelle loi «réparerait» la loi précédente. Au lieu de cela, nous avons un projet de loi qui répond nominalement à certaines préoccupations, mais exploite aussi cette opportunité afin d’introduire de nouveaux pouvoirs plus radicaux pour les agences de sécurité nationale.

Si l’objectif du projet de loi C-59 est vraiment de «réparer» les lois canadiennes sur la sécurité nationale, il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire.

[Signé par — en ordre alphabétique]

Amnesty International Canada
BC Civil Liberties Association
BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association
Canadian Association of University Teachers
Canadian Civil Liberties Association
Canadian Federation of Students
Canadian Journalists for Free Expression
Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles
Inter Pares
Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada
Ligue des droits et libertés
MiningWatch Canada
National Council of Canadian Muslims
National Union of Public and General Employees (NUPGE)
OpenMedia
Privacy and Access Council of Canada — Conseil du Canada de l’Accès et la vie Privée
Rideau Institute
Rocky Mountain Civil Liberties Association
Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)
Voix Juives Indépendantes Canada

Comme individu.e.s:

Elizabeth Block, Independent Jewish Voices, Canadian Friends Service Committee
James L. Turk, Director, Centre for Free Expression, Université Ryerson
Sharon Polsky, MAPP, Data Protection Advocate & Privacy by Design Ambassador
Sid Shniad, membre du conseil d’administration, Voix Juives Indépendantes – Canada