A Win for Privacy in Text Messages: Marakah and Jones

December 8, 2017

CCLA’s voice was heard in the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision released today in R v Marakah and R v Jones. Decisions about reasonable expectations of privacy should be made based on principle, not based on the way technologies work. The Court has sent a clear message, in both of these cases, that individuals do have privacy interests […]

Bill C58 is not the comprehensive reform needed

October 24, 2017

On Monday October 23rd, Cara Zwibel, Acting General Counsel of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association appeared before the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics in relation to the study of Bill C-58. A strong access regime is vital to a vibrant democracy. Without information about how our government functions, we simply cannot […]

Key Reports

Another preventable death in solitary confinement

May 24, 2017

Statement on the death of Guy Langlois   Another preventable death in solitary confinement. The CBC reports today that Guy Langlois, a 38-year-old Métis man from Québec, hanged himself in his cell in the Atlantic Institution in Renous, N.B., on April 24. Langlois had spent 118 days in segregation, or solitary confinement. Although he had […]

CCLA COMMENDS HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION ON RACIAL PROFILING REPORT

May 4, 2017

TORONTO – Racial profiling in Ontario is an issue the Canadian Civil Liberties Association is deeply concerned about and has been working for many years to address in policing, the criminal justice system, corrections, private security, and other sectors. CCLA strongly commends the Ontario Human Rights Commission on its new report on racial profiling, Under […]

CCLA welcomes amendement to fix gap in citizenship bill

April 11, 2017

On April 4, the Senate of Canada passed an amendment to Bill C-6, creating a right to a Federal Court hearing for Canadian citizens who are alleged to have misrepresented themselves in their original citizenship application. This important amendment ensures due process rights are upheld for individuals at risk of having their citizenship revoked. CCLA […]

Key Reports

Statement on release of new U.S. travel restrictions

March 6, 2017

The CCLA is still seriously concerned by the potential impact on refugees and asylum seekers of the new executive order released today by U.S. President Donald Trump restricting travelers from 6 mostly Muslim nations. “None of the major concerns in our Jan. 29 statement [see below] are abated,” says CCLA Executive Director and General Counsel Sukanya Pillay. […]

Contact Your MP: Ask Canada to Act on US Travel Ban

February 4, 2017

The CCLA has produced a template for a script to call or write to your member of Parliament asking Canada to act regarding the recent US travel ban. EMAIL YOUR MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT Exemple de lettre pour contacter votre député(e) en français ci-dessous. Merci aux bénévoles qui l’ont écrit! IN ENGLISH Here is a sample email script to […]

Letter signatories

Open letter on ministerial directives on torture

January 30, 2017

The Honourable Ralph Goodale Minister of Public Safety 269 Laurier Avenue West Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0P8 January 30, 2017 Dear Minister Goodale, We are writing to you about the urgent need for Canada to revise the Ministerial Directives on torture issued by the previous government to conform to the unconditional ban on torture in international […]

CCLA calls for concrete action from Canadian government on U.S. travel ban

January 29, 2017

STATEMENT FROM THE CANADIAN CIVIL LIBERTIES ASSOCIATION REGARDING IMPACT IN CANADA ON REFUGEES AND IMMIGRANTS OF THE JAN. 27 UNITED STATES EXECUTIVE ORDER (“PROTECTING THE NATION FROM TERRORIST ATTACKS BY FOREIGN NATIONALS”) TORONTO — The Canadian Civil Liberties Association deplores the Executive Order (“Protecting the Nation from Terrorist Attacks by Foreign Nationals”) issued by United […]

Surveillance and Democracy: Chilling Tales from Around the World

This report offers a ground-level view of some of the ways surveillance, and digital electronic surveillance in particular, is impacting on the lives of citizens and residents in Canada, as well as in countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. Separately, these stories describe concrete instances in which governments have used surveillance to violate civil and human rights. Together, they challenge the notion that digital and more traditional surveillance operations are harmless intrusions and that these tools are being used in democratic countries with adequate restraint and oversight.