An Overview of the Criminalization of HIV Non-Disclosure

Because the Learn section of TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words, opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out the In Focus section of our website.

Being convicted of an offense in the Criminal Code has the potential for imprisonment.[1] Because of this, criminal laws and their application engage one of the most important civil liberties protected under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms–our very right to liberty. Section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms states that “Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice”.[2]

The Criminal Code does not have specific offenses relating to HIV non-disclosure.[3] Instead HIV non-disclosure has been criminalized through the use of other offenses. Most notably, HIV non-disclosure cases have been prosecuted through the use of  aggravated assault and aggravated sexual assault.[4]

A person can be charged with the offense of assault when they “apply force intentionally to another person, directly or indirectly” without the consent of the other person. When that force is sexual in nature, a person can be charged with sexual assault. A more severe offense of aggravated assault/sexual assault is used when the assault endangers the life of the other person.[5] So, HIV non-disclosure cases have been prosecuted under the offense of aggravated assault/sexual assault because the non-disclosure of the HIV-positive person’s HIV status is seen as a fraudulent act that invalidates the HIV-negative person’s consent to the sexual activity. The offense is further aggravated because the serious health consequences associated with HIV are seen as endangering the life of the HIV-negative person.[6],[7]

The landmark case that set the stage for the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure is called R v Cuerrier, which was decided in 1998. In this case, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) held that failure to disclose one’s HIV-positive status to a sexual partner can lead to a conviction of aggravated assault because non-disclosure is effectively a form of fraud that invalidates the sexual partner’s consent to the sexual activity.[8],[9],[10]

The SCC revisited the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure in 2012 in two companion cases that were decided together: R v Mabior and R v D(C), which are more commonly known as Mabior. Mabior refined the ruling in R v Cuerrier and set out the current test for establishing when HIV non-disclosure can be criminalized. The SCC decided that consent will be invalidated and an HIV-positive person can be convicted of assault or sexual assault when all of the following 3 criteria are met:

  1. The HIV-positive person does not disclose or misrepresents their HIV status while knowing they are positive and at risk of transmission
  2. The sexual activity engaged in causes or poses a significant risk of serious bodily harm
  3. The HIV-negative sexual partner would not have consented to the sexual activity had they known of the HIV-positive person’s status[11],[12]

Criteria 1 and 3 are relatively straightforward, but criteria 2 is a bit more complicated.

Criteria 2 is easily met when HIV transmission actually occurs because the sexual activity is seen as causing serious bodily harm. But, what happens when HIV transmission does not occur? The SCC decided that the sexual activity “poses a significant risk of serious bodily harm” if there is a “realistic possibility of transmission”.[13],[14]

The SCC’s decision helps us understand when there is not a realistic possibility of transmission: when an individual’s viral load is low (<1500  copies per mL of blood)[15] or undetectable (<50 copies per mL of blood)[16] and condom protection was used during the sexual activity.[17] Effectively, this means that a person has no duty to disclose their HIV-positive status when their viral load is low or undetectable and a condom is used during the sexual activity.[18]

However, the SCC has left it open to provincial courts dealing with HIV non-disclosure cases to determine when there is a realistic possibility of transmission or to determine other circumstances where there is not a realistic possibility of transmission based on expert medical testimony presented on a case by case basis.[19],[20]

The decision in Mabior and the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure in Canada’s justice system, generally, has been criticized for its disproportionate impact on people from marginalized backgrounds, such Indigenous, Black and gay persons, and for its failure to keep up with advancements in medical research and treatment that have changed our understanding of HIV transmission risks.[21],[22]

However, on December 8, 2018, the Attorney General of Canada responded to this by issuing a directive on how HIV non-disclosure cases should be prosecuted in order for the criminal law to play an appropriate role in the management of HIV as a  public health issue that is in line with current medical science. The directive states the following:

” I direct the Director of Public Prosecutions as follows:

(a) The Director shall not prosecute HIV non-disclosure cases where the person living with HIV has maintained a suppressed viral load, i.e., under 200 copies per ml of blood, because there is no realistic possibility of transmission.

(b) The Director shall generally not prosecute HIV non-disclosure cases where the person has not maintained a suppressed viral load but used condoms or engaged only in oral sex or was taking treatment as prescribed, unless other risk factors are present, because there is likely no realistic possibility of transmission.

(c) The Director shall prosecute HIV non-disclosure cases using non-sexual offences, instead of sexual offences, where non-sexual offences more appropriately reflect the wrongdoing committed, such as cases involving lower levels of blameworthiness.

(d) The Director shall consider whether public health authorities have provided services to a person living with HIV who has not disclosed their HIV status prior to sexual activity when determining whether it is in the public interest to pursue a prosecution against that person.”[23]

Because this directive is coming from the Attorney General of Canada, it is only binding on federal Crown prosecutors. Therefore, it only directly affects the prosecution of HIV non-disclosure cases in the Territories because the criminal law in the Territories is administered by federal Crown prosecutors, whereas the criminal law in the Provinces is administered by provincial Crown prosecutors.[24]

It is yet to be seen if, when, and how the Attorneys General of each Province will follow this directive.

 

[1] Criminal Code, RSC 1985, c C-46 [Criminal Code].

[2] Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, s 7, Part I of the Constitution Act, 1982, being Schedule B to the Canada Act 1982 (UK), 1982, c 11.

[3] Department of Justice Canada, HIV Non-Disclosure and the Criminal Law (Fact Sheet) (Ottawa: Department of Justice Canada, 2017) [DOJ Canada Fact Sheet].

[4] Ibid.

[5] Criminal Code, supra note 1, at ss 265, 268(1), 273(1).

[6] DOJ Canada Fact Sheet, supra note 3.

[7] Department of Justice Canada, Criminal Justice System’s Response to Non-Disclosure of HIV (Report) (Ottawa: Department of Justice Canada, 2017) at p 11 [DOJ Canada Report].

[8] R v Cuerrier, [1998] 2 SCR 371, 162 DLR (4th) 513.

[9] DOJ Canada Report, supra note 7, at p 11.

[10] David Parry, “HIV/AIDS Introduction” (2011) 5 McGill JL & Health 3.

[11] R v Mabior, 2012 SCC 47, [2012] 2 SCR 584 [Mabior].

[12] DOJ Canada Report, supra note 7, at ps 11-13.

[13] Mabior, supra note 11.

[14] DOJ Canada Report, supra note 7, at ps 11-13.

[15] Mabior, supra note 11, at para 100.

[16] Ibid.

[17] Mabior, supra note 11.

[18] DOJ Canada Report, supra note 7, at p 12.

[19] Mabior, supra note 11, at paras 95, 104.

[20] DOJ Canada Report, supra note 7, at ps 12-13.

[21] Ibid at ps 28-31.

[22] Directive (Attorney General of Canada), (2018) C Gaz I, 4322-4324 (Volume 152, Number 49)

[23] Directive (Attorney General of Canada), (2018) C Gaz I, 4322-4324 (Volume 152, Number 49)

[24] Desmond Brown, “Justice Department issues new guidelines on prosecution for non-disclosure of HIV status”, CBC News (2 December 2018), online: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/canada-prosecutions-hiv-non-closures-cases-1.4929292

 

Un bref historique sur l’article 33 de la Charte…

Parce que la section “Apprendre” de TalkRights présente le contenu produit par des bénévoles de l’ACLC et des entretiens avec des experts dans leurs propres mots, les opinions exprimées ici ne représentent pas nécessairement les positions de l’ACLC. Consultez la section “In Focus” de notre site  pour consulter les publications officielles, les rapports, les prises de position, la documentation juridique et des actualités à propos du travail de l’ACLC.

 

Mieux connu sous les noms clause dérogatoire ou clause nonobstant, l’article 33 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés est une disposition unique en son genre en droit canadien. Bien que la population canadienne ait déjà entendu parler de cet article, très peu comprennent l’ampleur de son impact. Le présent texte a pour but de donner un aperçu du contexte dans lequel la clause dérogatoire a vu le jour, d’expliquer en quoi elle peut jouer un rôle crucial dans nos vies et de renseigner le public sur les enjeux actuels en lien avec cette clause.

 

L’origine l’article 33

Avant de devenir sa propre nation, le Canada était régi par l’Acte d’Amérique du Nord Britannique. Cet acte était la plus haute loi au Canada malgré le fait qu’elle provenait de la Grande-Bretagne. Ce n’est qu’en 1867 que l’Acte d’Amérique du Nord Britannique a changé de nom pour celui de Loi constitutionnelle de 1867. Cette nouvelle loi permettait au Canada de devenir une nation. Toutefois, étant donné qu’à l’origine il s’agissait d’une loi britannique, le Canada n’avait pas le pouvoir de la modifier pour l’adapter à l’image du Canada et seul le Parlement britannique pouvait le faire. Il aura fallu attendre jusqu’au début des années 80 pour que Pierre Elliott Trudeau, le Premier Ministre du Canada à l’époque, propose le rapatriement de la constitution qui permettrait aux élus canadiens de pouvoir modifier la constitution du pays.

En plus du rapatriement, Pierre Elliott Trudeau voulait inclure une charte des droits et libertés dans la constitution canadienne et en faire ainsi une partie de la loi suprême au Canada. Dans ce temps-là, le Canada avait déjà une charte canadienne des droits de l’homme adoptée en 1960. Cette charte reconnaissait les droits inhérents à tout être humain, mais n’avait aucune force contraignante sur les provinces. Ces dernières pouvaient créer des lois qui discriminent sans répercussions. Ce qui faisait en sorte que les droits et libertés étaient reconnus dans la charte, mais sans plus.

En tant que pays libre et démocratique, le Canada se devait d’assurer la protection des droits de la personne. D’ailleurs, le Canada avait pris part en 1948 à la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’Homme des Nations Unies. Le Canada s’était engagé à l’international à faire respecter les droits et libertés sur son territoire. Pierre Elliott Trudeau voulait donc intégrer à la constitution une charte sur les droits et libertés afin de contraindre tous les gouvernements canadiens à rédiger des lois qui respecte les droits de la personne. Naturellement, les provinces et territoires ont senti que leur pouvoir serait diminué par l’inclusion d’une charte dans la constitution. Ils se sont fortement opposés à l’idée. En effet, la charte avait comme conséquence de remettre au pouvoir judiciaire le droit de rendre inopérante une loi non-conforme à ses exigences.

En novembre 1981, un accord sur l’adoption de la charte est intervenu entre le ministre fédéral de la justice, Jean-Chrétien, et les procureurs généraux de la Saskatchewan et de l’Ontario, respectivement Roy Romanow et Roy McMurtry. Ceux-ci ont décidés de modifier le texte de la future charte canadienne et d’y ajouter une clause de dérogation permettant aux gouvernements de déroger à certains articles de la charte. Bien qu’il y ait eu un accord, il est important de mentionner que le Québec n’a jamais approuvé l’adoption de la charte.

Enfin, le 17 avril 1982, le Canada a rapatrié sa constitution et y a inclus la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés comprenant une clause dérogatoire. C’est dans une atmosphère d’oppositions et de compromis que la clause dérogatoire a vu le jour.

 

La portée de l’article 33

La Cour suprême du Canada a le devoir de veiller à la constitutionnalité des lois. L’article 52(1) de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés lui permet de rendre inopérante une loi qui porte atteinte à la liberté ou à un droit d’une personne ou d’un groupe de personnes. À partie de cette description, on comprend le rôle important qu’occupe les juges de la Cour Suprême dans le droit canadien. Bien que les lois soient adoptées par soit le Parlement ou les assemblées législatives, il en revient à ces juges de déterminer si les lois sont conformes aux articles de la constitution canadienne et donc, de la charte canadienne. Pour venir contrer le pouvoir des juges, un gouvernement peut soulever la clause dérogatoire pour faire maintenir une loi qui normalement serait reconnue comme étant inopérante par la Cour suprême.

Il s’agit-là d’un article extrêmement puissant qui peut avoir un impact considérable sur la vie des individus au Canada. Pour cette raison, l’article 33(1) de la charte canadienne rend possible la dérogation de l’article 2 et des articles 7 à 15 seulement. Cela dit, ce ne sont pas des articles anodins. Ces derniers sont les garants de plusieurs libertés et droits qu’une personne peut exercer quotidiennement. L’article 2 de la charte canadienne contient les libertés fondamentales telles que la liberté de religion, de conscience, de pensée, de d’expression et de croyance, d’opinion, de presse et des autres moyens de communication. Les articles 7 à 14 portent sur les garanties juridiques telles que le droit à la vie, le droit d’être informé dans les plus bref délais des motifs de son arrestation ou de sa détention, le droit à la protection contre les peines cruelles. L’article 15 traite du droit à l’égalité et des motifs de discrimination. Ce sont donc des articles très importants qu’un gouvernement pourrait décider de déroger en appliquant la clause dérogatoire. Heureusement, il y existe un coût politique à son utilisation. L’article 33(1) indique que le gouvernement qui consciemment adopte une loi qui portera atteinte aux droits d’individus doit clairement le déclarer dans une loi pour que la population sache que leurs droits ou libertés seront atteint malgré les dispositions de la charte canadienne. C’est un coût politique parce que les citoyens aiment rarement voir un gouvernement nier les droits et libertés de sa population et risque alors de ne pas voter pour ce gouvernement aux prochaines élections. De plus, la loi comprenant la clause dérogatoire doit être renouvelée au maximum tous les 5 ans sinon elle ne sera plus valide.

 

Les enjeux actuels

La clause dérogatoire est un couteau à double tranchants. Bien qu’il y ait des conditions à son utilisation ainsi qu’un prix politique à payer, la population canadienne n’est pas protégée des possibles utilisations abusives que pourrait en faire un gouvernement.

Dans la province de Québec, le nouveau gouvernement caquiste a laissé entendre qu’il a l’intention de sortir un projet de loi sur la laïcité de l’État. Ce projet de loi devrait interdire aux personnes en situation d’autorité qui travail pour l’État de porter des signes religieux en milieu de travail. En octobre dernier, le premier ministre, François Legault, informait le Québec qu’il n’hésiterait pas à faire appel à la clause dérogatoire si le fédéral tente de contester son projet de loi. Dans ce cas-ci, l’utilisation de l’article 33 aurait de grandes conséquences sur la population québécoise. Tout d’abord, la définition d’employés de l’État en situation d’autorité est très large et inclut des employés comme les enseignants ou les infirmières. Si le projet de loi est adopté, les enseignantes de confession musulmane pourraient être contraintes de quitter leur emploi pour ne pas devoir retirer leur hijab. En temps normal, ce genre de situation qui représente un cas de violation de la liberté de religion aurait pu être écartée par les tribunaux en déclarant la loi inopérante et sans effet. Cependant, la clause dérogatoire permettrait au gouvernement québécois d’aller de l’avant avec un tel projet de loi et d’ainsi porter atteinte à la liberté de religion.

En septembre dernier, après que la Cour supérieure de l’Ontario ait jugé que la loi du gouvernement ontarien était inconstitutionnelle, le premier ministre de l’Ontario, Doug Ford, a menacé d’utiliser la clause dérogatoire pour contourner la décision de la Cour et ainsi réduire le nombre de conseillers municipaux de Toronto de 47 à 25.

Les récents évènements du Québec et de l’Ontario ont soulevé des inquiétudes au sein de la communauté juridique et politique. D’ailleurs, le 12 décembre dernier, les trois personnes qui ont formé l’accord d’ajouter une clause dérogatoire à la charte (Jean-Chrétien, Roy Romanow et Roy McMurtry) ont dénoncé la mauvaise utilisation de la clause dérogatoire du gouvernement ontarien. Dans une déclaration commune ont peut y lire le passage suivant : « la clause a été conçue pour être invoquée par les législatures dans des situations exceptionnelles et uniquement en dernier recours après un examen approfondi » et « elle n’a pas été conçue pour être utilisée par les gouvernements à des fins pratiques ou comme moyen de contourner les processus appropriés ». Les trois auteurs de la déclaration reconnaissent l’impact que peut avoir la clause dérogatoire. Cette clause doit être utilisée avec prudence. Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, la clause dérogatoire a été utilisé que 4 fois dans toute l’histoire du Canada.

 

 

Bibliographie

Sources législatives

Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, partie I de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982, constituant l’annexe B de la Loi de 1982 sur le Canada (R-U), 1982 c-11.

Loi constitutionnelle de 1867 (R-U), 30 & 31Vict, c3, reproduit dans LRC 1985, annexe II, n°5.

Doctrine

Laurence Brosseau et Marc-André Roy, « La disposition de dérogation de la Charte » (2018) Publication n°2018-17-F, Étude générale, Bibliothèque du Parlement.

 Sources électroniques

Libertés fondamentales (10 décembre 2018), en ligne : <http://charterofrights.ca/fr/26_00_01>.

Paola Loriggio, « Chrétien et Romanow condamnent l’utilisation de la clause dérogatoire par Ford », La Presse (14 septembre 2018), en ligne : <https://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/national/201809/14/01-5196650-chretien-et-romanow-condamnent-lutilisation-de-la-clause-derogatoire-par-ford.php>.

 

 

 

 

Qu’est-ce que la discrimination ?

Parce que la section “Apprendre” de TalkRights présente le contenu produit par des bénévoles de l’ACLC et des entretiens avec des experts dans leurs propres mots, les opinions exprimées ici ne représentent pas nécessairement les positions de l’ACLC. Consultez la section “In Focus” de notre site  pour consulter les publications officielles, les rapports, les prises de position, la documentation juridique et des actualités à propos du travail de l’ACLC.

 

La discrimination est une action ou une décision défavorable envers une personne ou un groupe de personnes dont la justification repose sur un motif discriminatoire. Un exemple typique de discrimination est celui d’un propriétaire qui refuse de louer son logement à un individu parce    que ce dernier est de race noire. Un autre exemple peut être celui d’une femme occupant le même poste qu’un homme, mais qui reçoit un salaire moins élevé.

Ce qui caractérise une action ou décision de discriminatoire est sa justification. Si cette dernière est basée sur un motif illicite (ou motifs discriminatoires), il peut s’agir d’un cas de discrimination. Il est donc important de connaître les motifs illicites cités dans les différentes lois pour être en mesure de déterminer si une action ou une décision est de la discrimination.

 

Voici une liste des motifs discriminatoires les plus communs :

– La race                      – L’origine nationale ou ethnique                   – La couleur

– La religion                 – Le sexe                                                          – L’âge

– La déficience mentale ou physique

 

On retrouve ces motifs dans plusieurs lois dont la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne et les multiples lois provinciales ou territoriales sur les droits de la personne. Ces motifs peuvent varier d’une province ou d’un territoire à un autre. Par exemple, au Yukon l’origine linguistique est un motif de discrimination inclus dans la Loi sur les droits de la personne du territoire alors que ce même motif ne l’est pas dans le Code des droits de la personne de l’Ontario.

 

La liste suivante présente d’autres exemples de motifs discriminatoires :

– L’orientation sexuelle           – L’identité ou expression de genre

– L’état matrimonial                – La situation familiale

 

On peut remarquer dans cette liste que certains motifs semblent être plus récent. Il fut un temps, l’orientation sexuelle et l’identité ou expression de genre étaient des concepts non reconnus en droit. Aujourd’hui, plusieurs lois reconnaissent les droits des personnes de la communauté LGBT2I et accorde à l’orientation ainsi que l’identité ou expression de genre le statut de motifs illicites. Et donc, les motifs discriminatoires ne sont pas statiques. Il semblerait que ceux-ci évoluent avec la société.

 

Comment êtes-vous protégé ?

La discrimination fait l’objet de plusieurs lois. Au Canada, les trois plus importantes sont la Charte canadienne des droits et liberté, la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne et les lois provinciales ou territoriales. Le champ d’application de chacune de ces lois différentes dépendamment des parties en cause dans le cas de discrimination.

La Charte canadienne est une loi qui s’applique qu’aux gouvernements (fédéral, provincial ou territorial). Elle vient assurer aux individus un traitement sans discrimination de la part d’un gouvernement ou d’un représentant. Son article 15(1) énonce que tous individus est égale devant la loi et a droit aux mêmes bénéfices de la loi indépendamment de toute discrimination. C’est d’ailleurs dans ce même article qu’il est indiqué les motifs discriminatoires sur lesquels un gouvernement ou son représentant ne peut pas, en général, baser une action ou une décision. Par exemple, la Charte canadienne interdit aux gouvernements d’adopter des lois qui discriminent de manière défavorable les personnes de la communauté LGBTQ2.

De son côté, la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne interdit les organismes fédéraux de discriminer les individus sur la base des motifs discriminatoire énoncé à son article 3(1). Le terme « organismes fédéraux » fait référence, entre autres, aux ministères, aux banques, Poste Canada et tous les organismes financés de façon plus que considérable par le gouvernement fédéral. Et donc, un employé de Poste Canada ne pourrait pas refuser de servir un client parce que ce dernier est membre de la communauté sikhe et porte le turban. Une telle action serait de la discrimination fondée sur le motif de la religion. La même logique s’applique dans le rapport employé-employeur. Une banque ne pourrait pas adopter un règlement dont le contenu viendrait discriminer un employé atteint d’un handicap.

Chaque province et territoire possède ses propres lois sur les droits de la personne. Ce sont ces textes qui viennent protéger les individus contre la discrimination subit dans un espace privé tel qu’un magasin ou un restaurant. Ainsi, un commerce ne peut pas refuser de servir une personne à cause de son origine ethnique. Ces lois s’appliquent également aux organismes provinciaux comme la Commission des droits de la personne de l’Ontario.

 

L’exception à la règle

Toute discrimination n’est pas nécessairement interdite par la loi. L’article 15(2) de la Charte canadienne permet aux gouvernements de créer des programmes destinés à améliorer la situation d’individus ou de groupes défavorisés. Ces programmes peuvent alors se baser sur l’un des motifs discriminatoires de l’article 15(1) sans que cela soit considéré comme être de la discrimination négative. Par exemple, il existe un programme d’expérience de travail pour les jeunes autochtones. Comme l’indique son nom, ce programme s’adresse qu’aux autochtones et visent à les aider à acquérir de l’expérience de travail. Une personne non autochtone qui voudrait participer au programme ne pourrait pas soulever la race comme motif discriminatoire. L’article 15(2) permet au gouvernement de créer des programmes destinés à aider un groupe précis.

Dans la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, c’est à partir de son article 15 que l’on peut y lire des exemples de situations non considérées comme discriminatoire même si l’action ou la décision est basée sur un motif discriminatoire. Un exemple de cela est le refus d’embaucher un homme qui désire travailler en tant qu’intervenant dans un centre pour femme battu. Dans ce cas-ci, l’employeur pourrait justifier son refus d’embaucher un homme par la nature de l’emploi. Évidemment, il serait mal commode d’embaucher un intervenant de sexe masculin dans un centre pour femmes battues. Il n’y aurait donc pas de discrimination.

Il n’est pas facile de recenser tous les cas de discrimination. Chaque situation comporte ses propres particularités. Cela dit, une connaissance générale de ce qu’est la discrimination, des motifs illicites et des lois sur les droits de la personne permet d’être mieux préparer et de reconnaître les cas discrimination.

 

 

Bibliographie

Législations

Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, partie I de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982, constituant l’annexe B de la Loi de 1982 sur le Canada (R-U), 1982 c-11.

Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, LRC 1985, c H-6

Sources électroniques

Commission canadienne des droits de la personne, en ligne : < https://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/fra/contenu/quest-ce-que-la-discrimination>.

Cliquez Justice, en ligne : < https://www.cliquezjustice.ca/information-juridique/discrimination-au-canada>.

 

 

 

Vous avez des questions sur la discrimination ?

Parce que la section “Apprendre” de TalkRights présente le contenu produit par des bénévoles de l’ACLC et des entretiens avec des experts dans leurs propres mots, les opinions exprimées ici ne représentent pas nécessairement les positions de l’ACLC. Consultez la section “In Focus” de notre site  pour consulter les publications officielles, les rapports, les prises de position, la documentation juridique et des actualités à propos du travail de l’ACLC.

 

Vous trouverez ci-dessous une liste de ressources diversifiées qui vous permettra d’en apprendre davantage sur la discrimination.

Fédéral

La Commission des droits de la personne est organisme chargé de veiller au respect des droits et libertés des personnes dans leur interaction avec le gouvernement fédéral. Sur leur site internet vous trouverez des renseignements sur ce qu’est la discrimination et sur le processus de plainte.

https://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/fra

 

Cette page web vous explique vos droits en milieu du travail. Vous y trouverez de brèves explications des lois qui s’appliquent aux employés de l’État fédéral et des programmes gouvernementaux.

https://www.canada.ca/fr/patrimoine-canadien/services/droits-travail.html

 

Le site Canada.ca vous renseigne sur les droits des personnes de la communauté LGBT. Vous y trouverez un bref historique de l’évolution de leurs droits ainsi que des liens aux lois provinciales et territoriales sur les droits de la personne.

https://www.canada.ca/fr/patrimoine-canadien/services/droits-personnes-lgbti.html

 

La Bibliothèque du Parlement offre l’accès à des études sur son site internet. Le lien suivant vous amène à un compte rendu d’une recherche sur l’article 15 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Vous y trouverez son historique ainsi que des jurisprudences clés.

https://bdp.parl.ca/sites/PublicWebsite/default/fr_CA/ResearchPublications/201383E

 

Le ministère fédéral de la justice explique de manière approfondi l’article 15 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés.

https://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/sjc-csj/dlc-rfc/ccdl-ccrf/check/art15.html

 

Ontario

La Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne est une ressources clé pour trouver l’information nécessaire afin de mieux connaître vos droits. Vous y trouverez de l’information sur le processus de plainte, sur les différentes formes de discrimination et des modules d’apprentissage sur les droits et libertés.

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/fr

 

Cliquez Justice est un site où vous pouvez trouver des réponses à des questions juridiques sur de multiples sujets dont la discrimination. Bien évidemment, il est toujours conseiller de consulter un avocat pour obtenir des conseils juridiques spécifiques à votre situation.

https://www.cliquezjustice.ca/

 

Etablissement.org s’adresse aux nouveaux arrivants francophones de l’Ontario. Sur ce site, vous trouverez sous l’onglet « droit » des informations sur les droits de la personne dont harcèlement et la discrimination.

https://etablissement.org/ontario/droit/droits-des-personnes/harcelement-et-discrimination/

 

Nouveau-Brunswick

La Commission des droits de la personne du Nouveau-Brunswick offre sur leur site internet de nombreux renseignements sur les différentes formes de discrimination ainsi que sur le processus de plaintes. Vous y trouverez aussi une section actualité qui vous garde à jour sur les enjeux portant sur les droits et libertés au Canada.

https://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/fr/ministeres/cdpnb.html

 

Québec

La Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse est l’organisme provincial ressources pour toutes vos questions concernant vos droits et recours.

http://www.cdpdj.qc.ca/fr/Pages/default.aspx

 

Éducaloi est un site éducatif permettant aux personnes qui n’œuvrent pas dans le domaine du droit de trouver de l’information dans un langage clair et précis. En plus de leur article sur la discrimination, vous y trouverez plein d’autres sujets intéressants.

https://www.educaloi.qc.ca/

 

Ce site du gouvernement québécois vous donne les renseignements nécessaires pour porter plainte après avoir subit de la discrimination à la location d’un logement.

http://www4.gouv.qc.ca/fr/Portail/Citoyens/Evenements/vivre-en-logement/Pages/refus-location-discrimination.aspx

 

Site du gouvernement québécois sur la discrimination au travail. Une particularité de ce site est qu’il vous donne des liens à des ressources tels que de l’aide professionnel, de la formation, des conseils et outils.

https://www2.gouv.qc.ca/entreprises/portail/quebec/ressourcesh?g=ressourcesh&sg=873804224&t=o&e=705068571

 

Le site de l’Office des personnes handicapées vous aide à mieux comprendre la discrimination fondée sur le handicap à travers l’analyse d’un cas réel.

https://www.ophq.gouv.qc.ca/publications/cyberbulletins-de-loffice/express-o/volume-11-numero-2-juin-2017/mieux-comprenre/discrimination-fondee-sur-le-handicap.html?L=0%2527

 

La Commission des normes, de l’équité, de la santé et de la sécurité du travail explique sur son site internet la discrimination systémique fondée sur le sexe qu’est l’équité salariale.

http://www.ces.gouv.qc.ca/equite-salariale/equite_012.asp

In the News: National Security

Want to learn about national security issues and Canada’s national security agencies but don’t know where to begin? Here’s a list of recent articles compiled by a TalkRights volunteer to get you started.

Because the Learn section of TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers, opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA;s work check out the In Focus section of our website.

Canadian News

“CSIS Director Warns of State-Sponsored Espionage Threat to 5G Networks”, Robert Fife, Steven Chase, Colin Freeze, December 4th, 2018, the Globe and Mail https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-canadas-spy-chief-warns-about-state-sponsored-espionage-through/

“Some of CSIS’s practices still fall outside the law: spy watchdog” Catharine Tunney, June 20th, 2018, CBC News https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/csis-report-sirc-information-sharing-1.4714161

“CSIS gathered info on peaceful groups, but only in pursuit of threats: Watchdog” Jim Bronskill, December 19th, 2018, CBC News https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/csis-environmental-groups-sirc-1.4952030

“After 17-year deportation fight over alleged terrorism ties, Toronto man sues federal government for $34m” Brian Platt, January 4th, 2019, National Post https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/after-17-year-deportation-fight-over-alleged-terrorism-ties-toronto-man-sues-federal-government-for-34m

“Conservatives Call on Trudeau to Reach out to China’s President Over Detained Canadians” Robert Fife, Steven Chase, January 8th, 2019, The Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-official-opposition-calls-on-trudeau-to-reach-out-to-chinas-president/

“Here’s what you need to know about Canada’s “extraordinarily permissive” new spying laws” Monique Scotti, February 6th 2018, Global News https://globalnews.ca/news/3999947/cse-c59-new-spy-powers-canada/

“Spy agency expects foreign actors to attempt to sway public opinion online” Rachel Aiello, December 6th 2018, CTV News, https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/spy-agency-expects-foreign-actors-to-attempt-to-sway-public-opinion-online-1.4207164

“The Trudeau Government peels back bill C-51 – mostly” Justin Ling, June 20th, 2017, Vice News, https://news.vice.com/en_ca/article/wjzk94/the-trudeau-government-peels-back-bill-c-51-mostly

“Man who hijacked plane with detergent box to protest human rights abuses in Myanmar fights to stay in Canada” Adrian Humphreys, January 7th, 2019, National Post https://nationalpost.com/news/our-intentions-were-noble-the-means-were-wrong-man-who-hijacked-plane-with-detergent-box-to-protest-human-rights-abuses-in-myanmar-fights-to-stay-in-canada

“Man formerly detained in China recalls appalling experience” Andy Blatchford, January 7th 2019, The Star, https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2019/01/07/arrested-canadian-says-legal-trouble-followed-him-home.html

“Canadian Spy Manual Reveals How New Recruits are supposed to conceal their identities” Dave Chan, December 22nd, 2013, the Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/csec-sends-strong-message-of-privacy-to-new-recruits/article16087626/

“Just 3% of Canadians Can Name The Communications Security Establishment: Survey” Sean Kilpatrick, November 8th, 2018, the Canadian Press, https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/11/08/just-3-of-canadians-can-name-the-communications-security-establishment-survey_a_23270492/

“RCMP admits to using secretive spy tech to track Canadians’ cellphone data” The Canadian Press with files from Rahul Kalvapalle, April 5th, 2017, Global News, https://globalnews.ca/news/3359741/rcmp-spying-on-cellphones/

“RCMP officer asks Trudeau to look into secret spying allegation” Stephen Maher, May 15 2018, Maclean’s, https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/rcmp-officer-asks-trudeau-to-look-into-secret-spying-allegations/

“CSIS chief calls commercial espionage “the greatest threat to our prosperity”” Catharine Tunney, December 4th, 2018, CBC News, https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/david-vigneault-csis-economy-1.4932407

“Secret documents say Canada’s no-fly list poses “national security risk”, but a fix is still years away” Brian Hill, November 29th, 2018, Global News, https://globalnews.ca/news/4711155/canada-no-fly-list-national-security/

Up to 100,000 Canadians could be affected by no-fly list, research suggests” Robert Fife, December 11th, 2017, the Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/up-to-100000-canadians-could-wrongly-be-on-no-fly-list-research-suggests/article37299604/

“How can Canada condone torture?” Gerald Caplain, November 24th, 2016, the Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/how-can-canada-condone-torture/article33018131/

“Canada will use intelligence gained through torture if it will save lives” Bruce Campion-Smith, September 25th, 2017, the Star, https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/09/25/canada-will-use-intelligence-gained-through-torture-if-it-will-save-lives.html

“The difficulty of due process in the age of counterterrorism” Colin Freeze and Shar Fatima, May 22nd, 2015, the Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/the-difficulty-of-due-process-in-the-age-of-counterterrorism/article24579232/

Opinion Pieces

“Linking Immigration and Terrorism is Wrong, in Canada and elsewhere” Phil Gurski, November 12th 2018, the Ottawa Citizen, https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/gurski-linking-immigration-and-terrorism-is-wrong-in-canada-and-elsewhere

“Canada betrays its own citizens. Hassan Diab’s case if among its most egregious” Neil MacDonald, September 15th 2018, CBC News, https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/hassan-diab-1.4823570

“Why is Canada sanctioning Saudis while ignoring Iran?” Danny Eisen and Sheryl Saperia, December 11th 2018, the National Post, https://nationalpost.com/opinion/why-is-canada-sanctioning-saudis-while-ignoring-iran

“We are all Jamal Khashoggi” Julian Sher, December 7th 2018, the Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-we-are-all-jamal-khashoggi/

“CSIS, RCMP need more access to foil serious acts of violence” Phil Gurski, December 17th, 2018, The Hill Times, https://www.hilltimes.com/2018/12/17/high-techencryption-terrorism/181152

“Why we had to settle with Omar Khadr” Steven MacKinnon, July 26th, 2017, MacLean’s, https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/why-we-had-to-settle-with-omar-khadr/

“We need real, honest debate on Bill c-59” Kent Roach, Stephanie Carvin and Craig Forcese, December 4th, 2017, the Globe and Mail, https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/we-need-real-honest-debate-on-bill-c-59/article37175837/

International News

“Lip Service Paid to Human Rights During UN Counterterrorism Week” Letta Tayler, July 9, 2018, Human Rights Watch, https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/07/09/lip-service-paid-human-rights-during-un-counterterrorism-week

“Counter-Terrorism Methods Must Not Compromise Rule of Law, Human Rights, Secretary-General Stresses as, High-Level Conference Concludes” Secretary-General Press Release, June 29, 2018, the United Nations, https://www.un.org/press/en/2018/sgsm19120.doc.htm

“Edward Snowden: “The People are Still Powerless, but now They’re Aware” Ewen MacAskill and Alex Hern, June 4th 2018, The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jun/04/edward-snowden-people-still-powerless-but-aware

“Where America’s Terrorists Actually Come From” Uri Friedman, January 30th 2017, The Atlantic, https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/01/trump-immigration-ban-terrorism/514361/