CCLA's Submissions to the Committee Considering Bill C-51, Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015

Since the government tabled Bill C-51, CCLA has been speaking out about our concerns about the Bill.  CCLA has sent a written brief to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, summarizing some of our primary concerns about the Bill.  Read those submissions here.

We were also fortunate to have the opportunity to appear […]

The Anti-Terror Legislation is Unnecessary and Could Undermine Security

This morning the Commissioner of the RCMP, Bob Paulson, appeared before the House of Commons Committee on Public Safety and National Security to talk about the ongoing investigation into the actions of Michael Zehaf-Bibeau in Ottawa on October 22, 2014.  He also showed the Committee part of a video that Zehaf-Bibeau made just prior to […]

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Sukanya Pillay, our Executive Director and General Counsel, about Bill C-51 in The Huffington Post. Visit their site, or read it here:

 

There is no question the government must keep Canada safe from terrorist activities and threats, but Bill C-51 is not the answer.

Bill C-51 is wide-sweeping in powers and gift-wrapped in rhetoric. But contrary to […]

Release: Rights groups welcome statement from eminent Canadians calling for review and oversight of national security activities

RELEASE: Rights groups welcome statement from eminent Canadians calling for review and oversight of national security activitiesFebruary 19, 2015 – 

For immediate release

Today, a group of 22 eminent Canadians, comprised of former Prime Ministers, Ministers of Justice, Ministers of Public Safety, Solicitors General, Supreme Court of Canada Justices, and members of national security, law enforcement and […]

CCLA welcomes SCC decision re Anti-Terrorist Financing Laws and Solicitor-Client Privilege

The Supreme Court of Canada today struck down unconstitutional provisions in the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (“Act”), in its decision in Canada (Attorney General) v. Federation of Law Societies of Canada.

In summary, the Act and its Regulations required lawyers to record and retain records on clients for transactions above three thousand dollars […]