A Win at the Supreme Court on Internet Privacy

The Supreme Court of Canada has rendered its decision in R. v. Spencer, a case that considered the privacy interests that an individual has in Internet activities and affirmed that anonymity is a key component of the right to privacy.  The Court also clarified a point of long-standing disagreement between privacy advocates and law enforcement [...]

Ontario court upholds human rights decision on freedom of expression and union speech

On May 28, 2014, Ontario’s Divisional Court released its decision in Taylor-Baptiste v. OPSEU, confirming the right of the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal to consider Charter values, including freedom of expression, when assessing whether there has been discrimination under the Ontario Human Rights Code. The CCLA had intervened in the case to promote a robust [...]

CCLA supports students to launch court challenge of mandatory prom Breathalyzer

Recently the Canadian Civil Liberties Association wrote to Northern Secondary School outlining the organization’s concerns with the school’s plans to make every student entering the prom undergo a Breathalyzer test.  On Tuesday, May 20th, CCLA-cooperating pro bono lawyers filed an application in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice requesting a declaration that the proposed policy violates [...]

CCLA Challenges Federal Privacy Legislation

Click here to read the Toronto Star‘s front page coverage of CCLA’s challenge.

CCLA is bringing an Application in Ontario’s Superior Court of Justice to challenge parts of Canada’s federal private-sector privacy legislation, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA).  This is the law that regulates how personal information is collected, used and disclosed [...]

Supreme Court of Canada Strikes a Blow to Government Openness

The Supreme Court of Canada recently released its decision in John Doe v. Ontario (Minister of Finance), a case that interpreted an exception to Ontario’s provincial access to information regime for “advice or recommendations” of a public servant.  The case arose when John Doe, an anonymous requester, asked for information about amendments to Ontario’s Corporate [...]